FROM THE KNOX ARCHIVES


We would like to thank Douglas Clarke for creating this wonderful series from the Knox archives, in honor of Knox's 60th Anniversary which was in 2007. Travel down memory lane and learn about what has made Knox into such a great institution, and why Knox has made such a positive impact on so many lives over the years. These archives are comprised of Gleaner articles that have been published about Knox from before Knox was built through the 1980's. The articles are organized by the founding of Knox at the bottom of the page, to most recent at the top of the page. Enjoy!

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FROM THE ARCHIVES – LEST WE FORGET

The Inter scholastic athletic championships  (Boys Champs) was first staged in Jamaica in 1910. The winner was the Marescaux Road based – Wolmers Boys School.
In 1911 , the winner was Jamaica College – powered by the amazing performance of  Norman Manley who clocked 10.00 in the 100 yards , a record that stood for four decades.
For the first nine years of the competition, the winners were Wolmers, Jamaica College or St. George’s College. JC won six times, and St. Georges won in 1914.
In 1920, Munro College broke the tradition of the powerhouses, and became the first rural (country) school to win.  JC came back with a vengeance and claimed victory for the next three years.
From 1930 to 1933, Calabar High School joined the elite group of victors. Calabar also became the first school to win the competition four consecutive times.
In 1947, Knox College was founded with 12 students, on a rocky hill, with red dirt. That year Munro College won the Interscholastic Games. From 1947 to 1953, the completion was dominated by Munro College and Kingston College.
That same year ,  the Interscholastic Sports committee was dissolved , and the Headmasters Conference took over the running of all games in Government grant- aided secondary schools- games including Track and Field.  Rev. Canon P. W. Gibson – (Bishop Gibson) was the President of the Headmasters’ Conference at the time. Girls’ champs started in 1957, even though Jamaica had a female finalist in the 1948 Olympic Games – (Dr.) Cynthia Thompson.
1954 was a watershed year. A grand total of thirteen schools took part, including KNOX COLLEGE. Knox was only seven years old. That did not daunt the citadel built on rocks to compete against experience and resources. In the early days Knox sports day competition was held – not on the schools grounds, but at Duhaney’s common in Spalding. What is now the Knox field was still rocky and “undeveloped “.
Knox was one of six rural schools to enter that year. The others were Munro College, Titchfield High School, Beckford and Smith’s (St. Jago High), Mannings High, Cornwall College and Happy Grove – all long established schools. Happy Grove, for instance was established by the Quakers in the late 19th century. The Titchfield School was founded in 1786. Munro- 1856. Beckford and Smith’s was founded in 1744.
For the first time in the history of the games – all schools scored at least a point. Happy Grove, Knox and Mannings scored 4 points each.
Two records were established at the meet. One was established by RAYMOND MUSCHETTE OF KNOX COLLEGE. He established a new record for the Shot Put- 45 8", quarter-of-an-inch further than previous best of 45 7 3/4" by Bruce Excell in 1950.

Knox and Raymond Muschette lived up to the motto : Niti servire, Neque Cedere !
( Next time , Richard Crichton, Valerie Fleming , Molly DaCosta, Ruddy Baker , Elizabeth Reid ,Shirley Campbell , Jon Jones – etc. )

Submitted by Douglas Clarke, February 28th, 2009


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LET'S REMEMBER THE 1959 KNOX FOOTBALL TEAM:

LANCE ROYAL, JAMES MC INTOSH, WILLIAM HUTCHINSON, STOCKWELL COLE, DENIS NASH, MICHAEL SAMS, JEAN CLAUDE, ALFRED LOWEL PANTON

RUDY BAKER, EDGAR ROMERO, GREGORY ST JOUR, WALTER MORGAN, PATRICK THWAITES

Thanks to Knoxite Alfred Raven for sharing.


Niti servire, neque cedere
Submitted by Douglas Clarke, February 28th, 2009


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Thanks to Knoxite Alfredo Raven who attended Knox from 1957 – 1961  who allowed us to share this statement of fees he has had for years as a piece of Knox …

Part of the statement reads as follows :

TUITIONFEE.....£19
BOARDING FEE..£38
BOOKFEE ..........£1
SPORTS FEE.........10d
MEDICAL FEE.....£1
LAB FEE...............10d
STATIONARY&
PERSONAL EXP...£24.14s 2d
 
TOTAL TERM £84 .14s.2d

Submitted by Douglas Clarke, February 25th, 2009

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KNOX SALUTE 1989

The following article appeared in The Daily Gleaner in August 1989.

It is a reminder of the distance we have traveled as Knoxites, where we need to go and the need to preserve our history and tradition.

Douglas D. St. M. Clarke
Niti servire neque cedere

The Daily Gleaner, Monday August 21, 1989

Knox Salute '89'

All proceeds from Knox Salute ' 89 were handed over to the Knox Past Students’ Association recently at the offices of the sponsor, Desnoes and Ltd. Geddes Limited.

"Knox Salute”, '89 stage show was held at Brooks Park in Mandeville to raise funds for the development of Knox Educational complex in Spauldings.

Knox College was founded in 1947 by the Late, Rev. Lewis Davidson, a Scottish Educator and visionary who dreamed of establishing an institution that would provide total education. “Pops", as he was later nicknamed by his students, had come to  Jamaica two years earlier as headmaster of Wolmer’s Boys School.

Along with a small group of pioneers including David Bent, he  persuaded the Presbyterian Church to help  to help finance a school, and it  didn't take him long to decide that  the bird bush overlooking Spauldings would be the ideal location. Acquiring the land was easy enough because the owners of the forty acres had no use of it and gladly sold it to the young preacher for a few pounds per acre. Using available timber rocks and clay, the first buildings were constructed and classes started with six (6) students.

Lack of funds

 Today, the Knox Schools comprises a Preparatory School, Knox High School, and Knox Community College.

Other facilities include a dental clinic, a farm, meat processing plant and Knox Educational Services which supplies most of the exercise books used by school children throughout Jamaica.

But like all schools in the Island, Knox has fallen victim to lack of funds for maintenance and development. There is a processing need for more classrooms, furniture, a school bus, funds to provide gears and proper coaching for sports, and an auditorium in which the entire school population can assemble.

These and other pressing needs have been identified by the Past Students' Association and it was decided to go all out to raise funds to help improve the facilities at the school. “Knox Salute", now in its third year, is held annually in conjunction with the Knox Past Students' Association.

An estimated 9,000 persons patronised this year's show beating the previous Knox attendance record of 5,000 set last year.

Two Knox past students, Errol Lee and Paul Hamilton, leaders of the bands Bare Essentials and Ryddim Kings, respectively, backed an assortment of top-rated local artists which included Papa San, Lady G, Tiger,  Admiral Bailey, Edi Fitzroy, Gregory Isaacs, Sanchez, Carl Meeks and Ebony.

The show

 The show got underway at precisely 9:55 pm with MC Cordell Green introducing a number of Manchester artistes including area band Grand Jury which gave a pleasant account to themselves.

After Bare Essentials delivered their blistering one hour segment which included songs the likes of Shinehead's "Gimme no crack", Steel Pulse's "Stepping out" and Barrington Levy's "Bornland" they back all-female, Montego Bay group, Ebony who, also in a one hour performance, stung with a number of cover versions before ending with "Silly" their own Sly and Robbie-produced original which has done well in the UK reggae charts for the group.

Ryddim Kings. quickly gaining a reputation as one of Jamaica's best backing bands, then had the daunting ask of backing the other major artistes and did not fail in their task.

Gregory Isaacs, Tiger, Sanchez and Admiral Bailey were particular favourites but when Papa San and Lady G stormed the stage there was no stopping the crowd as the duo tore into their current rave hit 'Legal Rights".

The show finally ended at 5:45 am the following morning after eight hours of entertainment and as the crowd milled towards the exit gate, one patron was overheard saying “I cant wait for next year when Knox salute comes around again.


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A BLAST FROM OUR GLORIOUS PAST - GERRY GERMAN, ETC.

Mr. German and his wife Patsy were two of the solid teachers of the 50s and 60s who helped to make Knox the institution it is today. They came to Knox in the late 50s straight out of Bangor University, Wales.  Gerry was a history teacher, and Patsy taught French .She approached her craft with a great deal of enthusiasm and vigor, and Gerry made history come alive. Patsy later taught Spanish when there was a changeover in Jamaican high schools. They left Knox when Gerry was appointed Headmaster of Manchester High School, and when he left, he left his heart on Knox hill.

The Germans were equally enthusiastic outside the classroom. Among other things, Gerry stared in Gilbert and Sullivan’s “Patience” under the direction of then Knox music teacher, Miss Betty Vass.

The following is a quote from the Daily Gleaner of May 29, 1958 previewing the performance:

“…Raymond German is again the leading tenor and Roy Schlobohm was so amusing as the Admiral last year, will be the affected Oscar Wilde - like poet, Bunthorpe. The highbrow hero Grosvenor will be played by George Scott “ (Roy Schlobohm was the Chaplain at Knox and George Scott former  Principal- Vice Principal at the time.)dc Gerry German also appeared in “The Mikado”.

The following ad appeared in the Daily Gleaner of  June 26 , 1961:

KNOX COLLEGE will present:

THE MIKADO
by Gilbert and Sullivan

Starring—
Raymond German, Barbara Buckley, Mary Cairns
, George Scott, Cynthia Lawrence, John Gardiner.
at 8 p.m on July 5th/ in the Bevo Theatre, Christiana-
July 6th, in the Odeon Theatre, Mandeville.
July 8th and 10th, in Excelsior School Hall, Kingston.
Tickets 5/-, 7/6, 10/- obtainable at doors and from Knox College, Spaldings.
Students half-price.

(Barbara Buckley - Dr . Barbara Buckley Jones – former Principal
George Scott - former Principal)

 Also in the Daily Gleaner 1961 :
“… Knox College which has already established a repertoire of Gilbert and Sullivan’s successes is producing the “Mikado” in Christiana and Mandeville and in Kingston, at Excelsior School Hall tomorrow and Monday at 8:00 pm. Raymond German, an unusually pure lyric tenor, has the romantic lead in the role of Nanki Poo, Barbara Buckley, Jamaica’s netball captain is transformed in the ferocious Katisha.

George Scott at Pooh- Bah not only sings surprisingly well, but is the ultimate in pomposity that characterizes Pooh- Bah. The three little maids from school (Mary Cairns, Cynthia Lawrence, Sandra Dear) are as charming as ever. “

“…The whole, supported really well by the chorus and costumes, promises to provide splendid entertainment.

Even though retired, the passionate educator, the teacher and the mentor in Gerry German will not stop. He is as articulate and as sincere as ever – visit his website http://www.compowernet.org
Thanks !

Submitted : Douglas D. Clarke, February 13th, 2008
KAPS - NY


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THE SCHOLAR - ATHLETE WITH BEGINNINGS AT KNOX COLLEGE, 1969 

AS APPEARED IN THE DAILY GLEANER, SEPTEMBER 06 , 1969

 Mr. Peter E Graham 21. son of Mr. and Mrs. Bertie L. Graham of Christiana Manchester and New York, recently completed his studies at Brooklyn College of the City University of  New York, where he majored in Chemistry Mr. Graham is a former student of Knox College from which he graduated in 1965. While  at Brooklyn College Mr. Graham was a member of the Chemistry Society the Bio- Med Association and was captain of the soccer team, from which he was named to the All New York State Team He also was selected to appear in the 1969 edition of Outstanding College Athletes of America .

Mr. Graham received a scholarship to study towards his M D degrees at Down-state Medical Centre of the State University New York He plans to return to Jamaica for practice after he completes his medical course

(Dr. Peter Graham is a respected Consultant Oncologist. He still maintains a keen interest in Knox, and is an effective and positive mentor, and above all- a great source of inspiration. His faith has been grounded in God, and his sense of family has never wavered. dc)


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IN PURSUIT OF EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION, 1969


From its inception, the founders and well wishers of Knox College have always sought to make a difference in education and to make it relevant particularly to the needs of the surrounding Spaldings community. This was a vision of Dr. Lewis Davidson, and he stressed this at the official opening in September 1947. The wife of the Colonial Secretary, Mrs. Sylvia Foote officiated at the opening ceremonies, and extended her congratulations to Dr. Davidson and Mr. David Bent who worked in tandem to realize the beginning of the dream. (Mrs. Foot later became Lady Foot when her husband was knighted and became the Governor of Jamaica. Even later, she became Lady Caradon, when her husband, the Diplomat, was made a life peer.  )

 In pursuit of excellence, and in pursuit of relevant and innovative education, at Knox Rev. Davidson led a group of staff members to Nova University, Florida (now Nova Southeastern), in 1969.

Read about it as it was reported in the Daily Gleaner. (Below)

Douglas D. Clarke
1/14/08

THE DAILY GLEANER THURSDAY APRIL 10 1969

 (In pursuit of excellence in education)

 Modern education

Knox group leaves for US study. A group of eleven teachers from Knox College in Spaldings, headed by the Principal of the school, the Rev. Lewis Davidson left the island on Sunday or Fort Lauderdale, USA. The teachers are off to spend two weeks at the expense of State Department of the States Government. They will be staying at Nova schools in Fort Lauderdale, FL noted for highly original educational programmes designed to improve the learning ability of students. They will observe and study methods and organization of modern education which might be introduced at Knox, currently undergoing new developments in education — including a farm programme.

The teachers are the deputy principal, Mr. George Scott in charge of administration ; Mr. Leo Jones, Dean of students; Mrs. Barbara Jones head of the Language Department Mrs.  Gloria Miller, head teacher in the Prep school; Mrs. Sheila Hall, Messrs.  James Pulfer (chemistry), James Murray (biology), Robert Gray (physics), Anthony Kilburn (mathematics), and Ian Hardie (geography). Each member of the group has been given a particular assignment in the area of his or her specialization. On their return the staff will plan the future organization of the Knox programme to provide for independent study and continuous learning at different levels in a prograrnme to achieve academic excellence.

 The group will return to the island on April 19.

Submitted by Douglas Clarke


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SPALDINGS CHORAL SOCIETY, FOUNDED IN 1964. FROM A GLEANER ARTICLE WRITTEN ON JUNE 11th, 1965

When Knox College was founded, the town of Spaldings and its environs was arguably the center of cultural life in Rural Jamaica. The Spaldings Literary and Cultural Club was founded in the late 19th century by W. Hyde Macaulay, Member of the Parochial Board .

Officers of the club at various times included Mr. Macaulay, Miss D. L. Easy- who taught at Spaldings Primary School for about 50 years, and organist at the Spaldings United (Presbyterian) Church, Mr. B. A. Wallace (Brother Wall), who was senior elder at Spaldings United Church, the legendary N.A.L. “Teacher” Campbell who was schoolmaster at Spaldings Primary school for 40 plus years, a church organist and JAS local officer amongst other things.

There were readings and discussions on politics, on Shakespeare, Browning and other classical poets. The Club sponsored banquets, concerts, fairs – including the famous Spalding Agricultural fairs. In 1955, they embarked on a fundraising effort for a new Presbyterian Church building to replace the old one which was built in 1918. In 1959, the new (and current) building was opened – built by David Bent of Knox College.

The Club and its officers strongly supported and encouraged the establishment of Knox College in 1947. The school plugged into the cultural tradition of the town and widened it considerably.

The following article, from the Daily Gleaner is about the Spalding Choral Society which was founded in 1964.

NOTE: Mr. Malcolm Porteous was the music teacher at Knox, and followed in a line of outstanding musicians who served Knox previously. This include, Rev. Dr. Barry Davies, who left Knox to found a famous boys High School choir in Kingston, and was a Radio and TV producer, a teacher and a skilled organist. Much later he became Rev. and later a Dr. Barry Davies was also at one time a parent of Knox.

Also, Dr. Olive Lewin, of Jamaica Folk Singers fame, and of course Betty Vass, who may best be remembered as the producer, / musician of the famous Knox productions of the Gilbert and Sullivan’s operettas. Ms. Vass also worked very closely with the Mr. Ferdinand Powell (Maas Ferdie), Spaldings most famous and inspiring baritone

Leo Jones is of course our own “Bull Jay” – yes- he is an accomplished and awe- inspiring baritone;  Dudley Pinnock was an art teacher and hostel master at Knox; Ms. Alma Theilade , receptionist at KES and wife of KES manager Hans Von Theilade; Mr. Glen Pitters from Cobbla Youth Camp and a former parent of Knox.

On a personal note, my mother, Mrs. Louise Clarke, also sang with the Spaldings Choral Society.

THE ARTICLE

Friday, June 11, 1965 Kingston 

Choral Society recital:
A performance of Stalner' Crucifixion will be given by Spaldings Choral Society in the Spaldings Presbyterian Church on Sunday at 7.30 p.m.

The choir, which has come into existence during the past year to serve the cultural needs of the community, is not affiliated to any one church but draws its members from different denominations.

It is conducted by Mr. Malcolm Porteous of Knox College and is accompanied by Miss D.L. Easy of Spaldings Primary School. Soloists are Alma Theilade, Leo Jones, Glen Pitters, Alwyn Lynch, Michael Suckling, Kent Calkins and Dudley Pinnock.


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DANISH SALESMAN GIVES ART, CRAFT DEMDONSTRATION, SEPTEMBER 22nd, 1964


Hans von Theilade was the second manager of KES- the Knox printery. This printery manufactured most of the exercise books for all the schools in Jamaica. Knox Educational Services actually started with the donation of a printing press by Mrs. Duthie Webster in 1954. (The same philanthropist of Duthie Webster hostel fame.)

KES was an extension of the Knox bookshop. Mrs. Alma Theilade, wife of Hans was the ever pleasant secretary of KES.  (She also was a soloist in the Spaldings Choral Society.)

He extended the services of the bookshop by adding art and craft material to the inventory.  He regularly toured Jamaica, speaking to teachers and educational administrators about their needs, and then making them available for purchase at KES.

Mr. Theilade, a Danish man, was as much a manger, as he was a community person. The following Gleaner article tells also of his community involvement beyond the Knox Campus.

THE DAILY GLEANER, TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 22 1964

Danish salesman gives art, craft demonstration

WILLIAMSFIELD, Mr, Sept 15 (From our correspondent):

A demonstration in art and craft for Primary School teachers was given by Mr. Hans- Theilade Danish sales manager of Knox Educational Services. The demonstrations, which were held at the Spaldings Primary School on Saturday, was attended by Primary School teachers from Manchester, Clarendon and St. Ann.

Mr. Theilade, said that he was from a country where craft was well developed in the home as well as in school, and that this medium a .person could distinguish the difference between the hands and the brain, not only for instituting art and craft for good family life, but for making money.

There was a demonstration in using a carpet needle for making carpets and weaving cotton. Another class is expected to be held on October 16.


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AT KNOX SUMMER SCHOOL, AUGUST 8th, 1953

The Knox Summer Schools operated like a University, and exposed ordinary and the not so ordinary to the best in the world of intellect and the humanities. The concept was organized and produced largely through the instrumentality of Jean Davidson.

 The following articles will inform and recall. (See also my notes)dc

 THE DAILY GLEANER, SATURDAY AUGUST 8 1953

The boldness is paying off

At Knox Summer School

Gleaner Staff Reporter

SPALD1NGS, Cn., Aug. • 5:

The yearly bold try-out in way of life is going on now at Knox College.

A hundred people together for two weeks this summer are reading, writing, painting, praying, studying, music practicing , dancing plain lazing — and talking politics.

Knox College is a dozen red and white buildings sprawled beautifully on the brow of the hill overlooking this town. The mornings sparkle here, and the evenings are cool, and sounds come up from the valleys in the afternoons.

The boldness is paying off. Since last Monday eve’s lead-off on a lecture by Daily Gleaner's Editor, Theodore E. Sealy ("On the road to Nationhood") the course has settled down to a pattern of pursuit of political discussions, while .simultaneously creating the arts and wooing the crafts.

Artists do not exactly lurk behind every bush, but several easels dot the College perimeter. Among them I saw Albert Huie placing his firm strokes on a small landscape canvas, and Cors Hamilton whipping op a promising little thing of banana trees in growth on the edge of Spaldings.

Pat Montgomery is clicking out a short story which may well end up in the Gleaner, and potter Cecil Baugh talked preoccupiedly over a new kiln idea.

Humour and advice

Just before sunset yesterday behind a screen of trees dancer Ivy Baxter and her company were practising a routine; then in the late evening Tom Murray's string quartette played a Haydn trio and Kay Campbell sang to their accompaniment a quietly pretty excerpt from a Bach Cantata. Through it all the Rev. Lewis Davidson, head of Knox College, roams with quiet words of humour and advice.

The lectures are strongly attended. Last night Mr. David Coore spoke on "Our duty to ourselves as an emerging People," stressing the need for sound leadership in emergence. Tonight it will be Dr. W. E. McCulloch, and tomorrow night Dr.Cecily Williams will talk on "Our duty to family and children”.

The morning seminars encompass most of the -hard core of this summer course. Chosen with a view to concentration on matters close up to the country rather than academic sweep, the headings include 'Education,' by Professor D'Aeth; 'Citizenship.' By Mr. Rawle Farley: Economic and Agricultural Development by Mr. and Mrs. Eddie Burke: 'Home Life and Social Welfare,' by Dr. Cecily Williams and Mr. E. Lowes. No leash is held on ideas in this place at all — the road blocks are down for discussions. "Give us- a spirit of quest," sportshirted Rev. Cyril Dorsett prayed at morning devotions' today, and chose for his opening hymn "Unite us in tie sacred love of knowledge, truth and Thee, “And let our hills and valleys shout the songs of liberty”.

NOTE:  Hon. David Coore, OJ Q.C., was Deputy Prime Minister and Finance, and also served as Foreign Minister

Dr. the Hon. Cecily Williams was a pioneer in the field of medicine and was honored by the Jamaican Government for her work in health care, particularly her diagnosis of the common and often fatal condition kwashiorkor in Africa.

Hon. Theodore Sealy former editor –in-chief of The Daily Gleaner, and lecturer in the Department of Mass Communications of the University of the West Indies was the Dean of Journalism in Jamaica and the Caribbean.

 Ivy Baxter was Jamaica’s dance pioneer. In her choreography, she successfully fused classical as well as traditional styles, and Professor the Hon. Rex Nettleford was one of her early students. He later went on to found the world famous NDTC.

 Albert Huie, Master painter and a true pioneer , is widely considered the Father of Jamaican Painting

 The name Cecil Baugh is synonymous with pottery- a teacher and potter and a legend. In Caribbean artistry, he is second to none.

 Submitted by Douglas Clarke.


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KNOX COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIP WINNERS, APRIL 16TH, 1949

Knox was opened in 1947.

By 1949, Knox was ready to offer scholarships to students. See as reported. You may recognize some of the names. Yolanda Azan was a John Beattie Award winner.

Douglas

THE DAILY GLEANER SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 1949

 Knox College Scholarship Winners

The Knox College Board of Governors has awarded Tuition Scholarships to the following Presbyterian children in the Southern Presbytery: — Joyce Brandt, of Spalding School. Yolanda Azan of Knox College, Genevieve Fearon, of Devon School, Jean Wong, of Spaldings School.

 The James McNeee Memorial Scholarship for the children of Presbyterian pastors has been awarded to Lois Gordon, of Askenish School, Allan Waite of Knox College. 


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KNOX COLLEGE OPENS 1947

 THE DAILY GLEANER. FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 5. 1947.

Mrs. Foot Opens Knox College


Mrs. Creech Jones
Attends Big Function at Spaldings:

AS THOUGH recalling  the atmosphere in which John Knox the famous Scottish reformer and historian performed his great work, a hazy mist shrouded the mountain summit in Spaldings, near the Clarendon-Manchester border as Mrs. H. M. Foot, wife of the Colonial Secretary "turned a key and officially opened the college building, bearing his name—Knox College. People swarmed in from all parts of the island representing every section of Jamaican life. The list of visitors was headed by Mrs. Creech Jones, wife of the Secretary of State of the Colonies; Mrs. Foot, the Hon. J. B.  Thursfield Custos of Manchester and Mrs. Thursfield, Mr. W. D. Linton. MHR,  north-western Clarendon and the Hon. B.H.  Easter, Director of Education.

In the unavoidable absence of Mr. G. Louis Byles who is now on a visit to Switzerland, the opening ceremony was chaired, by Mrs. Ken Hart, wife of Dr. Hart.

A STEP FORWARD

 Light showers and heavy mist in the early afternoon did not dampen the spirit of the people. It was a step forward in the educational field, not only for Clarendon but for the island on a whole. The fair which accompanied the opening went on well into the night and was followed by a dance for which Miss Ivy Graydon and her harmony makers played. Due to preparations for the visit of the Secretary of State to Clarendon, the Custos, the Hon. A.M. Pawsey, and many other prominent people were unable to attend.

Speakers in one accord acclaimed the achievements of the Presbyterian Church in the field of education and moreso for the milestone they had reached in establishing Knox College at a place which is conducive to good living and high thinking with the necessary outlay for vast improvements.

Mr. Lewis Davidson the principal was congratulated for his great work in convincing the Presbyterian authorities of the need .for the college in Jamaica. His assistant, Mr. David Bent also shared in the praise for his untiring work to get the institution going.

Following a short service conducted by the Rev. Mr. Gray. Mrs. Hart welcomed and introduced the guests. She said they had hoped to have His Excellency the Governor and Lady Huggins and Mr. Foot and many other prominent people at the ceremony but they were kept busy by the visit of the Secretary of State to the island. They had had from His Excellency and Mr. Foot not only their regret for not being able to attend but charming letters wishing the venture a success.


EXTREMELY PLEASED

They had not dreamt of welcoming Mrs. Creech Jones at the function so soon after her arrival in the island (applause). They were extremely pleased to have her with them. Mrs. Hart went to speak of the great debt they owed to the Presbyterian Church in Jamaica for their vision to see the educational need, and the courage to go ahead to meet it. In all their plans for the college they had tremendous and vital support from the Church of Scotland as well as from the church in Jamaica.

They had received greetings from the Church of Scotland, from the Church of Scotland—in the United States, the Cayman Presbyterian Church and from Mr. Percy Junor, who is resident in Spaldings and from many others, some of whom were not connected with the church. They had many such persons on the Board of Governors. They were grateful to them all for the great assistance they gave and are still giving.

Speaking of the response,  the people had given to the college's appeal, she said the gathering at the fair poke for itself. Having been present at the college for the first term, she could bear witness to the wonderful response to the call for students and to the great teaching they were being given.

The church had had the supreme good fortune of having as their principal Mr. Lewis Davidson. She did not think they could find anywhere a more splendid first assistant than Mr. David Bent, and with both those gentlemen they should associate the names of their splendid wives who gave fully, of every type of services.

To be headmaster of a school was one thing. There were various duties which would fall to their lot But they had in the two gentlemen, men who would turn their hands to do anything and that was why they were so pleased in having them.


MRS. FOOT SPEAKS

 Mrs. Foot said she was very proud indeed in being given the privilege of opening the door of the college. As she came in the premises Mrs. Creech Jones was just coming  in and she asked her to open the door of the college, but the said no as she was without a hat.

Some long time ago, she said, her husband and herself received invitations to open the college and she was thrilled. She wanted to visit Spaldings because she wanted to see the college and to meet all the people. In her anticipation of the visit she thought that her husband would be there with her and he would do all the public speaking, thus she would be able to enjoy herself. But out of the clear she saw a cloud and that cloud took shape when it was announced that His Majesty's Secretary of State for the Colonies would visit the Island at the same time.

She knew in a flash that her husband would not come and that she would have to do the public speaking. When the trap was dosed on her she tried several means to get out, but Mr. Lewis Davidson's request was couched with such charm that she felt pretty badly. There were the gentlemen around her such as Mr. Easter and Mr. Linton who had spent the better, part of their time beguiling vast assemblies with their honied tones who would not be outdone and therefore they should not expect much from her.

SPIRIT OF JOHN KNOX

 As she opened the door of the college, she said,  it seemed to her that the spirit of John Knox was with them. It seemed to be right that that seat of learning should be dedicated to the great reformer, the man with the burning eyes and long beard , who lived his life battling against the forces of superstition. All educationists, whether they like it or not, are side by side with the reformer. They are battling against the forces of superstition. At this stage, Mrs. Foot whipped up some added humour in her speech,  to demonstrate its benefits. Mrs. Foot told the students that there was the privilege of creating a tradition. Their teachers and their well-wishers could not do it for them. It was for them and they alone to build up a  reputation and create a tradition which would be a shining glory in Jamaica.


MHR WELCOMES GUESTS

 Mr. W.D. Linton as MHR for the constituency in which the college is situated, welcomed the guests. He had heard as he sat in the corner that Mrs. Foot would speak and he was somewhat different, wondering what she was going to say. He was sure that she had made a great speech. A great speech, not from multiplicity of words but from the sincerity in which she gave it. He knew that Mrs. Foot's influence in other parts was going to assist them at the college. He was greatly heartened to see the large gathering that had turned out to the opening. He wanted to tell Mr. Davidson that the presence of so many people there was indicative of two things. One, the great need for education and that the people, not only in Clarendon but all  over the island were prepared to give all the support that Knox College and others throughout the island would need in the future. As he saw the Director of Education on the platform he knew that despite the fact that they had had several directors of education who had been interested but he wanted to say of Mr. Easter that he was always willing to give a hearing to people when they brought sound proposals to him. As he saw- him at Knox College, he was greatly encouraged to go back to the councils and make proposals for the college. He was sure that Mr. Easter was one person who would do his best.

PIONEERING WORK

 
Most of his hearers did not know of the pioneering work done by the Director, but he liked that sort of thing. By the opening of Knox College they in the centre of the island had set a beacon light on education that would burn brightly not only for Spaldings and adjacent  districts, but for the entire island.

Mr. Linton made apology for the unavoidable absence of the Custos of Clarendon and went on to speak of the church’s part in the advancement of education. He finally pledged  as' MHR for northwestern Clarendon to do all in his power on behalf of the college and assured the gathering that it would receive the full support of his constituents.

Mr. Easter spoke on behalf of the education department He said the department appreciated the establishment of the college and while he could give no definite promises,  was sure that if the college proved its worth those in authority would do what was possible to give it assistance.

The Hon. J. B. Thursfield spoke of the advancement of education in England and Scotland at the instance of the churches, which was taken over in latter years by the" government. But the churches were coming in again. He was glad they were. He wished the college every success as well as those who would work in it.


POLICY OF COLLEGE

 The principal, Mr. Lewis Davidson outlined plans for the future. He said that in his opinion, if an old man or an old woman wanted to learn something, it was the duty of the school to teach them and give demonstrations for their benefit. That would be the policy of Knox College.

Mr. Davidson also spoke of the struggle in getting things into shape and of the arduous work done by Mr. David Bent his assistant. He said he had never worked with a greater Jamaican.  He thanked Mrs. Foot and all other guests who had come and given them encouragement, and each and everyone for their kindness, sympathy and generosity.

Mrs. Hart made the closing remarks and the function came to an end with the singing of the National Anthem. In spite of light rain a concert was held at which such artistes as Roy Duncan, Julian Barber, Leo Dyce, Horace Barber. Miss Sybil Foster- Davis, Miss Joy Thompson, Miss Norma Lawson. Miss Shirley and Miss Louise Bennett took part.

Submitted by Douglas Clarke

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THE EARLY KNOX FOUNDERS, MAY 6th, 1947

 

HELLO KNOXITES ,
As we continue to celebrate Knox 60, let us look back at the early days and our founders. Here is an article which I hope you will find interesting. I hope you will also see the connection to the founding and development of Knox.

The article appeared in the Daily Gleaner , May 6 1947.

Of note, Mr. N. A. L. Campbell is the great Teacher Campbell, headmaster of Spalding (Government) School at the time. He was a strong supporter of the establishment of Knox.

Mr. B. A. Wallace is “Brother Wall” – long time resident of Spaldings, and father of Knoxites, Beth –Ann, John, George. He was also a senior elder of the Spaldings United Church.

Some of us may remember Ms. Nash, Dairy Farmer –from Limit- nearby Spaldings

G. O. Atkinson – “Doc” , Druggist (pharmacist) and elder of Spaldings United Church

Mr. George Nelson was for many years, Mayor of May Pen

Most of us will remember Miss Easy- teacher, social worker, organist at the Spaldings United Church- for several decades- maybe 50 years!

Mr. F Powell – Maas Ferdie- great bass/ baritone from Spaldings and community activist

Thanks

Douglas D. Clarke

KAPS(NY)

 

THE DAILY GLEANER. TUESDAY, MAY 6, 1947.
Spaldings J.A.S. Branch
In Annual Meeting
SPALDINGS, April. 30.—

(From our correspondent) Spaldings Branch. J.A.S. held its annual general meeting last Friday evening at the Government Schoolroom here .Despite rain which fell during the late afternoon a goodly number of members and visitors attended.

Mr. N. A. L. Campbell, President of the Branch, occupied the chair. The Rev. Lewis Davidson, M.A., headmaster of Knox College was guest speaker. Following reading and confirmation of the minutes and presentation of President's, Secretary's, and Treasurer's reports, Mr. J. A. Graham, Supervisor of Agricultural Instructors for Clarendon, moved a vote of thanks to officers and Mr. B. A. Wallace recorded.

Mr. L. L. Swapp   spoke deploringly of the paucity of members of the Branch in such a thickly populate agricultural area and suggested that a drive be made by members for increased membership. He also pointed out that the very high cost of preparing land for cultivation i.e. £9 per acre, made planting very uneconomical and unprofitable no matter what kind of crop is grown, and suggested that the Branch procure a hill-side plough aid steers for hire to members. Messrs. Powell, Graham, and Nelson spoke in support, and the Chairman said that the matter would be referred to the Managing Committee for attention.

Election of officers resulted as follows: — President, Mr. N. A. L. Campbell (re elected; 1st Vice- President, Miss Una Nash; 2nd. Vice- President, Mr. B. A. Wallace: Secretary. Mr. G. Oliver Atkinson (re-elected); Asst Secty.  Mr.  George Nelson. Treasurer Miss Doris Easy (re-elected.)

Mr. Davidson then addressed the meeting. He directed attention to the serious problem of soil erosion, pointing out that the conditions obtaining were preventable and that proprietors should take steps to contour their holdings in order to prevent the precious surface soil from being washed away whenever it rained. The soil was a living thin thing made up as it is of millions of organisms, and it should be carefully cherished as it belongs not only to the present users but to posterity. The constant uses of artificial fertilizers, he said, tended to lessen soil fertility. He therefore advocated the keeping of animals on the farm so that the organic manure may be obtained to rebuild the soil. The number of Agricultural Instructors at present employed was inadequate to overtake the work they were called to do. He advised farmers to cooperate with these officers for their betterment.

Mr. Davidson was heartily thanked for his instructive and interacting address.

Miss Easy and Mr. F.  Powell then rendered a recitation and a vocal solo respectively. Refreshments were served by a bevy of ladies. A local orchestra enlivened   the evening’s proceedings and the signing of “The King “terminated the evening’s proceedings at around midnight.



*********************************************************************************** 


KNOX, WHEN IT WAS STILL A DREAM. MARCH 26th, 1946


THE DAILY GLEANER. TUESDAY, MARCH 26. 1946.

Mr. Lewis Davidson, back From Educational Tour In Britain, U.S.

Modern Ideas Will Be Applied To New School At Spaldings


Progress with the ultra-modern school which the Presbyterian Church in Jamaica proposed to establish at Spaldings, Manchester, is expected to be made now that Mr. Lewis Davidson, M.A. the headmaster designate of the school, has come back to the island filled with practical ideas on modern education gained in Britain and the United States of America.

Mr. Davidson, who returned yesterday by Pan-American Airways plane from Miami, has gained firsthand knowledge of modern educational trends in the two English speaking countries, and will report to the committee in charge of the project as to ways and mean of establishing the school.

I have been in Britain for the last six months, and spent a good deal of time visiting schools and colleges in England throughout England trying to find out what was best in education", said Mr. Davidson in an interview with the "Gleaner".

Seen at the Myrtle Bank Hotel, in company of the Rev, J.A. Beattie, M. A, retiring Chairman of the committee in charge of the school scheme, (who incidentally, is scheduled to leave the island today at the end of his period of service in Jamaica). Mr. Davidson gave a full account of his visit abroad.

SAW 'HELPFUL' PEOPLE

"I had the opportunity of seeing quite a lot of people who were very helpful", added Mr. Davidson. Among these he mentioned the Undersecretary of State for the Colonies, the secretary of the advisory committee on education in the colonies; and “various other people of that sort who could help me to think through the problem of education in this country”. Mr. Davidson disclosed that he then went across to the United States in January of this year, and there saw similar people engaged and interested in education. "I had a fortnight in Washington where I saw something of the philosophy behind high school education in America, and then later, had the opportunity of seeing it in practice in colleges in New York and in the South", he said. "I spent a. certain amount of time in Virginia State College for Negroes, and also at Tuskegee Institute," he added.

Now that Mr., Davidson is back, the plans and estimates for the school are to be worked out between him and the committee, on which the Rev. Henry Ward has succeeded Mr. Beattie as chairman.

Blueprint of the school, which is planned to be a combination educational centre training school for the Presbyterian Church, and a general folk school, is to be drawn after Mr. Davidson has exchanged ideas with the committee and the problem of how and where to start thoroughly threshed out.

Half the amount of money required for the project (-£10,000 is the total sum) has already been raised, and an appeal is still being made to the public for further funds to complete the goal.

Submitted by Douglas Clarke, Feb 19th, 2008


*********************************************************************




HELLO KNOXITES ,
As we continue to celebrate Knox 60, Let us look back at the early days and our founders. Here is an article which I hope you will find interesting. I hope you will also see the connection to the founding and development of Knox.

The article appeared in the Daily Gleaner , May 6 1947.

Of note, Mr. N. A. L. Campbell is the great Teacher Campbell, headmaster of Spalding (Government) School at the time. He was a strong supporter of the establishment of Knox.

Mr. B. A. Wallace is “Brother Wall” – long time resident of Spaldings, and father of Knoxites, Beth –Ann, John, George. He was also a senior elder of the Spaldings United Church.

Some of us may remember Ms. Nash, Dairy Farmer –from Limit- nearby Spaldings

G. O. Atkinson – “Doc” , Druggist (pharmacist) and elder of Spaldings United Church

Mr. George Nelson was for many years, Mayor of May Pen

Most of us will remember Miss Easy- teacher, social worker, organist at the Spaldings United Church- for several decades- maybe 50 years!

Mr. F Powell – Maas Ferdie- great bass/ baritone from Spaldings and community activist

Thanks

Douglas D. Clarke

KAPS(NY)

 

THE DAILY GLEANER. TUESDAY, MAY 6, 1947.
Spaldings J.A.S. Branch
In Annual Meeting
SPALDINGS, April. 30.—

(From our correspondent) Spaldings Branch. J.A.S. held its annual general meeting last Friday evening at the Government Schoolroom here .Despite rain which fell during the late afternoon a goodly number of members and visitors attended.

Mr. N. A. L. Campbell, President of the Branch, occupied the chair. The Rev. Lewis Davidson, M.A., headmaster of Knox College was guest speaker. Following reading and confirmation of the minutes and presentation of President's, Secretary's, and Treasurer's reports, Mr. J. A. Graham, Supervisor of Agricultural Instructors for Clarendon, moved a vote of thanks to officers and Mr. B. A. Wallace recorded.

Mr. L. L. Swapp   spoke deploringly of the paucity of members of the Branch in such a thickly populate agricultural area and suggested that a drive be made by members for increased membership. He also pointed out that the very high cost of preparing land for cultivation i.e. £9 per acre, made planting very uneconomical and unprofitable no matter what kind of crop is grown, and suggested that the Branch procure a hill-side plough aid steers for hire to members. Messrs. Powell, Graham, and Nelson spoke in support, and the Chairman said that the matter would be referred to the Managing Committee for attention.

Election of officers resulted as follows: — President, Mr. N. A. L. Campbell (re elected; 1st Vice- President, Miss Una Nash; 2nd. Vice- President, Mr. B. A. Wallace: Secretary. Mr. G. Oliver Atkinson (re-elected); Asst Secty.  Mr.  George Nelson. Treasurer Miss Doris Easy (re-elected.)

Mr. Davidson then addressed the meeting. He directed attention to the serious problem of soil erosion, pointing out that the conditions obtaining were preventable and that proprietors should take steps to contour their holdings in order to prevent the precious surface soil from being washed away whenever it rained. The soil was a living thin thing made up as it is of millions of organisms, and it should be carefully cherished as it belongs not only to the present users but to posterity. The constant uses of artificial fertilizers, he said, tended to lessen soil fertility. He therefore advocated the keeping of animals on the farm so that the organic manure may be obtained to rebuild the soil. The number of Agricultural Instructors at present employed was inadequate to overtake the work they were called to do. He advised farmers to cooperate with these officers for their betterment.

Mr. Davidson was heartily thanked for his instructive and interacting address.

Miss Easy and Mr. F.  Powell then rendered a recitation and a vocal solo respectively. Refreshments were served by a bevy of ladies. A local orchestra enlivened   the evening’s proceedings and the signing of “The King “terminated the evening’s proceedings at around midnight.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Phillip Slosberg.
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